Drone legislation passes House

We move closer to having in place much-needed, common-sense legislation to regulate drone usage and protect public safety and privacy. My drone bill, HB 291, which includes the Citizens’ Freedom from Unwarranted Surveillance Act, passed on consent in the House of Representatives today.

The bill sets parameters for permitted and prohibited uses of drones; provides exceptions including allowing school districts to use drones for educational and other purposes; prohibits use of evidence obtained by a drone in violation of stated prohibitions; creates a new section of KRS Chapter 501 to clarify criminal liability for offenses committed using a drone; creates a new section of KRS Chapter 525 to create the offense of obstructing an emergency responder; and creates a new section of KRS Chapter 511 dealing with the issue of trespassing on critical infrastructure.

 

Week in review

Last week in Frankfort was a blur of productive activity! From speaking to the Small Business Caucus at their breakfast in the Governor’s Mansion, to presenting my drone bill (HB 291) with bipartisan support from a multitude of stakeholders and gratefully, unanimous bipartisan passage by my committee colleagues, there just weren’t enough hours in the day. The week also saw the passage through Judiciary Committee of HB 93, my bill providing enhanced penalties for assaulting our K9 partners of law enforcement who are the front line protection for our officers. Special thanks to Sheriff Chuck Korzenborn, Deputy Terry with Shadow, and Commonwealth Attorney Rob Sanders, as well as Doug Morgan, President of the Houndsman Association for their testimony on this bill. We missed having Senator Wil Schroder at the table, due to a schedule conflict, but appreciate and recognize his work and filing of this bill on the Senate level in years past.

This week also brought visits from our Kenton County and Boone County Republican Women’s Clubs, our elected clerks, judges, PVA’s, Judge Executives, Sheriffs, Deputies, and County and Commonwealth Attorneys, not to mention a whole host of advocacy groups such as those representing public libraries, children, and home builders.

I also have the distinction (not sure if that is good or bad!) of filing the last bill of the session (photo of me in blue in front of clerk’s desk).  16807596_1383921194993115_3088064387204832100_n 16649215_1383921038326464_8016068271380834176_n 16832077_1383921034993131_4283842499204256326_n

Remember, you can reach out to me when we are not in session as well. (859) 341-1231.

Pension Transparency Bill is Good First Step

Senate Bill 3, which passed the House and Senate the first week of the 2017 session, and was supported by State Representative Diane St. Onge, provides an example for needed government transparency by making the value of lawmakers’ pensions available for public viewing.

Kentucky’s pension systems have a shortfall of more than $80 billion – with a “b.” Pension reform begins with transparency, making the legislators’ pension transparency bill a solid first step, with much more work to follow.